One more reason to root for the end of winter

They’re half-healed.

They’re not.

My fingertips usually give me problems during our cold winters, splitting to reveal raw and bothersome cracks because of repeated use to clear the snow off my dear wife Karen’s Mazda and my Chevy and shovel the driveway of the Little Bitty in the Syracuse city neighborhood of Eastwood.

Yes, I’m wearing good gloves.

Yes, it hurts.

It hurts.

I took a thumb-selfie in an attempt to explain what I mean. And that’s in a stage of recovery from the rawest state.

This year has been worse than usual, I think because I’ve been using my hands even more since my start in October as a cashier at the store. Handling the wand to shoot the bar codes of the products on all sizes of flat beds and other carriers, punching the buttons on the registers, and rasslin’ all those various carts in from the parking lots allows my two paws little or no recovery time.

A little dab will do 'ya.

A little dab will do ‘ya.

On the plus side, the store is also where I spotted O’Keefe’s distinctive brand of hand cream. I purchased the green tub when I got off shift from the lumber register one day. I use it when at my splitiest, and it does a good job of hydrating my mitts.

And yet I think the only full recovery of the split ends will come with spring and summer.

Does winter rough up your hands and fingers? What’s your best suggestion for protection and recovery? What’s winter’s worst effect on you?

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32 thoughts on “One more reason to root for the end of winter

  1. Mark, I use to have this problem constantly, winter and summer. They are very painful! I discovered when I quit drinking the water from my faucet and started drinking bottled water, my fingers quit splitting. I think it is because of the chlorine and other chemicals they put in our water. Now, I make my coffee and tea with distilled water and drink bottled water. I haven’t had my fingers split since. Hope you can get yours healed soon!

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  2. Its the dryness keep them greased up at night and wear white gloves to bed-overnight will do miracles to keep moisture in and aid in healing! The days you are off and not on-line grease them and let them heal-easier said than done I realize. Once they crack open it is hard to get them to heal with continued use. Sorry, you’re having this problem (it is painful)! The Gatorette.

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  3. ooh, i know this and how it hurts. i have the same problem, worse in the winter, mainly because i have to wash my hands so many times a day when working with the kinders. i’m going to try this product and see how it goes – happy healing )

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  4. Ouch. Doesn’t happen too often to me in winter, but family is loyal to a very old product, Zim’s Crack Crème. It seems to work. Not sure what the magic is. Good luck, Mark. Spring is around the corner. ☺☺☺

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  5. My skin takes a beating too. Dry, itching, flaking, eczema, some cracking — I depend a great deal on moisturizers. It’s less painful than summer skin for me though, which is why I’m so fond of temps 20-70 🙂

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  6. Ouch! My hands used to split and bleed every winter growing up in the east. I never knew why. Doesn’t happen here in the west but with my now older hands, having less collagen and fat in my skin, they can get bruised up pretty quick with the slightest tap! I’ve been telling people I have old-lady skin on my hands now. ❤
    Diana xo

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  7. Oh yeah, I’ve had those Mark! They can be tough and especially if they don’t get healing time. I used to get chillblains on both my hands and feet. I don’t know if you know what they are but they are not fun at all. I still get them on occasion when it gets kind of cold here but it’s nowhere near as bad as they used to be. It’s one of the unexpected benefits of living in a warmer climate.

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  8. We have incredibly dry weather here in the winter, despite its being temperate and that makes my hands very very dry. We own that very pomade! It helps and at least doesn’t have a strong fragrance. But, like you there, we wait for spring to ease up this problem as it gets a bit more humid then. We are in high desert, so, dry, dry, dry.

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