The War Memorial part of the Syracuse arena is impressive

The Onondaga County War Memorial in Syracuse, N.Y., built in 1941 at still standing proudly.

The Onondaga County War Memorial in Syracuse, N.Y., opened in 1951 at still standing proudly.

Last week I brought you the hockey report from our visit to the Onondaga County War Memorial to see the Syracuse Crunch of the AHL.

My dear wife Karen went back Friday night, just six days later, so I decided to make the historic, 61-year-old building in downtown Syracuse the star of the work on my iPhone 6.

I decided to throw the black-and-white filter on the photograph above to better bring out the cement block lettering that announced the intention of honoring those that have served our country.

Outside of Onondaga County War Memorial lobby.

Outside of Onondaga County War Memorial lobby.

The view through the windows reveals an exhibition lobby inside. Last week, a children’s dance troupe was performing on the polished marble floor to welcome fans.

Profile in courage.

Profile in courage.

I think she looks beautiful in profile, too, with the Syracuse city in the background.

The inside lobby.

The inside lobby.

The inside lobby stands tall and grand. Flags fly proudly.

Wars and soldiers are paid tribute inside the main councourse.

Wars and soldiers are paid tribute inside the main councourse.

Look, read and learn.

Look, read and learn.

Step inside to the main concourse, and an exhibition hall chronicles all wars and conflicts fought by American soldiers.

If you give yourself a half-hour before a game or designate the time between periods, you can educate yourself greatly. It can be sobering.

Shortly after taking these photographs, I put my right hand over my heart during the playing of the National Anthem. I always do, but I had more thoughts than usual during this rendition. I visited the traveling Vietnam Memorial wall when it came to Syracuse and entertained a similar spectrum of sadness and gratitude.

By the way, the Crunch beat the Albany Devils 3-2 in front of just shy of 6,000 full-throated fans in a wildly entertaining overtime game. Syracuse had to score with 90 seconds left to extend the match and earn the chance to notch its 10th victory in a row. A new hockey arena in Syracuse could be great, but …

Alas, Saturday night, the Crunch fell 4-2 to Worcester, ending the win streak at 11. The comeback Friday night was the last stand.

Have you visited a public memorial for military service people, and where was it? What emotions did you feel during the visit? Do you think the history of old buildings like this should be considered in the sports venue building considerations?

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26 thoughts on “The War Memorial part of the Syracuse arena is impressive

  1. It is a beautiful and stately place Mark. You know your new camera does an awesome job – it felt like I was standing in the hall not just looking at pictures. Memorials and history like that become so much more relevant as we gain maturity and can better understand the sacrifices made by those whose stories are told there. I was actually pondering this the other day as i read a post on Mindful Digressions about comsumption. When we (as a society) increase productivity, it allows value to be added to our society in the form of non-consumables, like this beautiful memorial fo those who kept us free, and other initatives like the space program, or museums or libraries.

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    • We need these non-consumables, and we need to understand their value to society, Paul. Great addition to this discussion. I read Doobster’s post on Consumption. He’s a good one over there. Did you know that he, like me, went to the University of Maryland? Small world. We went at different times, but when he told me that, it made me very happy that I followed in his steps, both of us many decades ago.

      I am truly appreciating the camera on my new iPhone 6. I’m glad you are, too, my friend.

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  2. We went to a private museum in Canton Ohio for the Air Force that was full of memorials, it was lovely. And lovingly being taken care of. I do appreciate the memorials and museums. I think they should be valued and respected.

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  3. I love how Americans honour those who serve Mark.

    The Canadian public is starting to do so, but our Government, although happy to send troops to war, seriously fail in taking care of Vets when they get back. This past year we “accidently’ did not spend millions allotted for Vets suffering from PTSD. It makes me furious!

    I’m hoping Canadians will smarten up in the next federal election.

    Diana xo

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  4. Very solemn and a great tribute no matter where it is located. I like outdoors memorials, statues and gravesites. I also like the Port Clinton Memorial on Lake Erie… Great post and glad you share the photos and your personal thoughts, too.

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  5. what a beautiful place (and pics) and i can image it must bring huge emotions to the forefront, to stand in the midst of it. sometimes standing in a special place can be the most powerful lesson in the world.

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  6. Hi Mark! Glad I found your blog, really missed your writing. I’m a Senior Event Attendant at the War Memorial and work there a couple of times a week. I love this building. Amazes me how many guests never make it into Memorial Hall. What a beautiful space!

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    • It’s a shame that visitors don’t visit Memorial Hall, Ed. It’s a significant portion of the building! I’m glad you found my blog, too. See you at an event, and thank you for your kind words.

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  7. Excellent choice with the black and white filter! What a cool memorial. Sister Michelle, the war history major, would have loved seeing this in person. I’m so glad you are patriotic and stand and put your hand over your heart at sports events when the National Anthem is played. (I’m sure if you wear a hat, you remove that, too.) It sickens me that so many people these days have no clue they should do that.

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