A different place to put the front garden

Now this is a front front front yard garden.

Now this is a front front front yard garden.

I’ve noticed an interesting little garden one block over in our Syracuse city neighborhood of Eastwood.

As I walk with Ellie B aka Dogamous Pyle, I try to keep her away from this one particular front yard garden, because it’s the only one of its type I’ve seen in these parts.

This particular neighbor has decided to put great effort into a several foot wide strip of land that borders the street.

It’s an interesting concept, with flowers and plants and whatnot, with a rail tie where a curb would be if we had curbs in our neighborhood.

Go ask Alice.

Go ask Alice.

I particularly do not want Ellie B to get any ideas about the ornamental rabbit used as the centerpiece of this stretch of streetside garden.

I have decided to call this white rabbit Alice.

Have you seen gardens pressed right against the street where you live? What interesting uses of space have you spotted? Where would you like to see ornamental animals turning up by surprise?

42 thoughts on “A different place to put the front garden

  1. That garden’s pretty, but where I live, the neighborhood kids would have trampled it before it ever took off. I would like to be surprised by an ornamental ant eater turning up in my bedroom… It might scare my cricket away! ๐Ÿ˜‰

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  2. Living in Tennessee, I’m never shocked about what I see in a yard. However, many of the homes in the neighborhoods surrounding me, put mulch or large decorative rock toward the curb of their yards. Looks rather nice if you ask me. But that’s in comparison to the other neighbors who still have their Christmas lights attached to their mailboxes….

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  3. That’s pretty creative, Mr. B. Good idea to keep Ellie B away! I think you have had enough rodents and critters ornate your back yard. ๐Ÿ™‚ I love seeing lush road islands filled with vibrant colors. I see a lot of them on the Cape. Have yourself a good work week. Labor Day is right around the corner! ๐Ÿ™‚

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  4. One night several years ago, someone rang our bell and ran. But not before leaving an ornamental Great Blue Heron. We thought of it, jokingly, as a different way to give the bird. We took a photo of it and put it on Facebook. A neighbor told us which yard the bird belonged in and took it to its rightful owner.

    This is my long way of saying that a front yard garden and an ornamental anything might turn up missing or damaged. It’s a beautiful way to make your yard and neighborhood more attractive … but. ๐Ÿ˜‰

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  5. This is a new way to decorate the edge of the yard, maybe due to not wanting to mow along the edge? I think this is fun and pretty, glad you will remind Ellie B. not to focus on the bunny rabbit, appropriately named, Alice, by you! smiles for your local pictures and you do give us smiles a lot here!

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  6. I love the rabbit name. Segue…. many moons ago the kids had a rabbit. It was very fat. And grey. So they named it after their dad. Fat Rabbit Roy. Not because their dad was fat, he wasn’t, but he was grey. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    I have not seen gardens by the road. Or oddly placed animals. We did have an elderly lady in the last community I lived in that planted artificial flowers on the incline by her drive way. Others made fun of it. I loved it. For what ever reason (convenience? constant color? no need for constant maintenance at her age?) she ‘planted’ it and I enjoyed it. As I’m sure others did too. ๐Ÿ™‚

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    • Yes. What to say about a comment so full, Colleen. Roy isn’t fat but he is gray. For that I am happy. I am getting thinner and I am gray and thinner there, too so Ray and I are compadres but I do not have a rabbit named after me that I know of.

      I do not know of artificial flowers planted around here, but I would cheer it if I saw it. Artificial lawn, too, for that matter, for the convenience factor. You go brave people who would go that far!

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    • Colleen, my Mom who lived on Lake Erie had lots of ‘real’ gardens but she had these baskets of artificial silk flowers on either side of her front door step. I loved them, because they would be ‘changed’ to fit the season, so fall would have brought orange, yellow and dark red chrysanthemums, spring lilies and tulips, I guess I could not resist telling you that I agree, I think many people complimented her on these larger sized baskets, I am glad you admired the one in the last community who did this, Colleen! Hugs, Robin

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  7. Is it an attempt to stop cars parking on the grass? Like the name for the rabbit – you could sneak in one of those gnomes to keep it company!

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  8. Hello Mark. I don’t have a blog, but found you via Kim at Quiet Desparation (who I found through another blog I follow…). This doesn’t look strange to me, but I’m in the UK, where flower borders in front gardens aren’t unusual. Interesting isn’t it โ€“ย cultural differences. I don’t do the border thing at the front though โ€“ it’s low maintenance shrubs for the front, which the birds love โ€“ saving time and energy to play (plant) in my back garden! I’m not sure what my dog would make of the ornamental rabbit! Enjoying your blog and an insight into life in another part of the world.

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    • I’m very glad you found me so you could share how things are in your part of the world, Cicely. The border shrubs sound quite nice, as well as a fine way to add privacy to your home and a place for the birds to sing away. We have a butterfly garden out back, and a big, old rose bush at the corner or our back porch, too, as well as three different gardens in front. Just not waaaay out front. Great to hear your thoughts, my new friend.

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  9. I have not seen this around here, Mark. I would think the salt from winter would harm plants if planted by the street. Looks nice though, I must admit. And thank you for keeping your companion away from the white rabbit. (smile) Love, Amy

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  10. i like that concept, i have one myself in a way. here, we have a small strip between the sidewalk and the street in most cases, and i refer to it as ‘the hell strip’ because it can be difficult to grow things there. most people plant grass or do a small garden and i’ve gone the garden route, lilies, hostas, and vine to keep it easy, pretty and low maintenance. i’m a fan – and i love the surprise elements like the animals )

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  11. Here in Ottawa, the city owns 12-15 feet in from the curb and have the right to do whatever they wish with it. Although we are required by law to maintain it, we have no say in what is done with it. For that reason, I doubt anyone here would put a garden that close to the road. I do like the look of it and the rabbit too – Alice, ha!- it could easliy go by-by with no apology or explanation. Also we use a lot of salt on the roads here in winter and it collects in the ground close to the road. That makes grwoing sensitive flowers problematic. Also there is quite a bit of vandalism and the flowers would be picked quickly. Last but not least, we have a lot of street parking and people could end up standing in your garden.

    I really like the look Mark, but I wouldn’t want to have to defend the poor garden. Great post and pics. Thank you.

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    • I like the look, too, Paul, but we have many of the same problems as Ottawa … but I am unaware of Syracuse owning any of what I believe to be my property to the street. Tough winter road maintenance with plows and salt and sand, oy! Cars parking to the edge. I believe that is the purpose of the railroad tie, the saving barrier. You wouldn’t want to pop a tire on that baby. Knock on wood, nobody has picked our flowers. Three miles away downtown, though, they had that problem when they planted tulips in sidwalk squares. All were picked clean.

      You’re welcome, my friend. Now I’m wondering what I will read from you with my cuppa Joe at Willow’s spot tomorrow morning.

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    • In our backyard butterfly garden, my dear wife Karen and I have placed a rather artistic concrete birdbath on a stand to agree with that principle, Barbara.

      I haven’t named it, though. I need to be inspired, and Alice so easily popped into my head for said Rabbit.

      I hope you are well today down Virginia way, my friend.

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