This time Good Neighbor Tim’s got the butterfly

By mid-July, I’d hoped to be able to proudly show you the purple blossoms on my most mature of butterfly bushes in the backyard garden of my dear wife Karen and I at our home in the Syracuse city neighborhood of Eastwood.

Look hard for purple at the top.

Look hard for purple at the top.

Yes, I can, but not in the striking manner in years past.
Here’s what the furthest of the four in our butterfly garden looks like this morning.

So I hope I can thrown in this little word. Yet. More and bigger blooms to come, unless this past harsh winter did something to screw up this summer’s butterfly bush cycle in our garden.

But that hardly matters today.

This is immediately on the other side of our fence. (Photo by Tim Garriques)

This is immediately on the other side of our fence. (Photo by Tim Garriques)

After I got home from work last night, I received this photo in an email from Good Neighbor Tim.

Holy cow, right? That’s next door, not inches on the other side of the fence from our butterfly garden.

“We have yet to see a swallowtail butterfly this year, but we continue to hope,” he wrote of he and his lovely wife Lorraine.

From our good neighborly talks, I know that they’ve had to replace the butterfly bush between that harsh last winter and this season.

Fantastic first year, I’d say.

However, Karen also informed me that Tim told her that they believe our big daddy bush somehow germinated a baby on their side of the fence. And that purple blossom looks familiar to me.

Wouldn’t that be something?

Tim’s quite a great photographer, no?

Earlier, he sent me a striking shot of our strawberry moon for posting here.

How does the last harsh winter seem to be affecting your garden this summer? What’s popping out in your backyard right now? What’s the best picture somebody’s emailed you lately?

38 thoughts on “This time Good Neighbor Tim’s got the butterfly

  1. All my gardening friends are remarking on the shortage of butterflies this summer. Not sure what the reason is but you are not alone. BTW, Mark, just in case you don’t already do this, when winter comes mulch the heck out of that butterfly bush and it should be just fine.

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  2. I saw that strawberry moon over the Shrewsbury River here in New Jersey. We had the kiddies in the car and, literally, pulled over to watch it rise.

    When I was living in Phoenix, people used to keep hummingbird feeders outside their apartment buildings. Pretty amazing creatures.

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  3. what a nice surprise and a nice neighbor. as for my plants, some of them have not bloomed yet, my giant hydrangea, and some of my lilies, but the good news is that i somehow also have discovered a baby butterfly plant growing, along with couple of baby hydrangeas, proof that life goes on. the circle of life.

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  4. The burning question being – what does go on back and forth over that fence late at night? How did those baby flowers that look so familiar get into the neighbor’s yard? Hmmm?

    Ha! Great post Mark – you’re neighbor is indeed a good photographer.

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  5. I love how you talk to your neighbor and that he actually has your email address! Too often, in today’s world we don’t even know who our neighbor is!

    Lovely photos Mark and here’s hoping your flowers go into full bloom soon!
    Diana xo

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  6. I hope you don’t have to play flower support if it’s your yard’s responsibility. No new flowers here, but the first two figs of the summer just came in!

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  7. Tim sounds like a nice neighbor to have. (Of course you do too!) He’s not who owns the tall pines, is he? Yes, I do think that’s your butterfly bush that germinated on his side! ๐Ÿ˜€

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